11 of Australia’s best designed yoga studios

You'll be inspired to stretch out on the mat.

Good Vibes Yoga Studio, studios, Australia, interior design

We know yoga is primarily an internal practice, but a beautifully designed studio has the added benefit of promoting that sense of calm nourishment that enhances a good practice. We scoured Australia to find yoga studios to inspire, so you know where to stretch out on the mat whether you’re in your home state or travelling.

1. Happy Melon

Approachable mindfulness is at the core of this Melbourne studio, and it also became the design brief for the interior design. ­The result is a calm, homely space with thoughtful design touches including full marble bathrooms, handmade light fittings by Anna Charlesworth and artworks by Leila Jeffreys and Gemma Smith.

Website: www.happymelon.com.au

2. Hom Yoga

Hom Yoga aims to deliver a seamless experience and this motto extends into the design of their Sydney and Singapore studios. Always taking advantage of the full height of spaces and windows to encourage openness and natural light, the pared-back interiors are simple, peaceful and inspiring, with the added appeal of re-milled silvery oak timber furniture in the welcome areas.

Website: www.homyoga.com.au

3. Humming Puppy

As well as being a beautifully sleek design, with Silvertop Ash shiplap interior cladding, the standout features at Humming Puppy is the sound and vibration technology, incorporated to heighten the yoga experience. World-class engineers ARUP are responsible for the creation of a physical ‘hum’, different frequencies emit resonance for various intentions, from grounding to elite performance. Walls have extra layers of soundproofing to genuinely cocoon clients from the outside world and submerse/submerge them deep into the practice.

Website: www.hummingpuppy.com

4. IXL Lounge

A background in interior design meant that this yoga studio owner had a clear creative philosophy when it came to opening her studio in Hobart: a space to reflect the lifestyles of the students and provide them with a safe and restorative place in which to practice. IXL Lounge flavours its space with subtle yogic elements such as a simple Buddha and wall quote, while custom mixed wall colours and a combination of natural, candle and dimmable LED lights create a calm haven.

Website: www.ixllounge.com.au

5. One Hot Yoga & Pilates

Two paradoxical desires formed the design brief for this Potts Point studio housed in a 1930s building. The yearning to elevate the everyday through luxury, and the yearning for meaning and simplicity, informed the resulting studio, which explores the complex interplay between body and space. The belief that the space we enhabit – both internal and external – influences physical and psychological wellbeing, finds realisation through a palette of warm timber, crisp white light and metallic brass details. A unique hydronic heat source provides much-needed moisture for skin, eyes and body during a practice.

Website: www.onehotyoga.com.au

6. Sage Yoga

A home away from home; where healing and self-enquiry can take place in a supportive, inclusive environment was the intention for this space in Perth. It has a rear entry so that the sacred space is not entered into directly, with subtly delineated areas for practice, social and retail spaces. Custom built raw timber furniture sits on the hardwood floors (existing Jarrah and new bamboo), with touches of colour – including sage of course – highlight the neutral base colours. Handmade soy candles and a laser cut mandala ceiling feature light the space in an ambient fashion.

Website: www.sageyoga.com.au

7. Urban Yoga

This uber contemporary studio in Sydney’s Surry Hills focuses on the experiential element of the practice, hoping to entice urban yogis to connect with each other and themselves on the mat. A major screen delivers an immersive visual experience while the finely tuned playlists keep yogis inspired on the mat. The striking design adds to the atmosphere of an upmarket community gathered in an urban oasis.

Website: www.urbanyoga.yoga

8. Yoga 213

A relocation to a larger open plan space provided an opportunity to realise an original design concept, while incorporating additional facilities for this unique hip hop yoga studio in Richmond, Melbourne. A simple partition divides the space into reception and studio, while ambient lights, recycled timber joinery and pops of colour create a vibrant space to promote the joyful element of this yoga practice.

Website: www.yoga213.com.au

9. Yoga XTC

A focus on reinvention of the self in terms of health and fitness called for a seamlessly integrated design experience, from existing brick work to new plywood panelling. Inside the yoga studio, the frosted sliding door and a sublime artwork by Adrian Doyle emit a sense of zen tranquility, while a series of backlit frames invite students to look inwards, listen to breath and leave the outside world behind during practice.

Website: www.yogaxtc.com.au

10. The Yoga Vine

Situated in the heart of Perth’s CBD, this boutique studio has a simple philosophy that translates to the interior design: yoga should be accessible to any body and every body. Catering to time-poor and often-stressed city workers, the space provides a soothing and calm oasis through a neutral, minimalist palette with eco-friendly props that maximise the feeling of wellbeing.

Website: www.theyogavine.com.au

11. Good Vibes Yoga

Japanese and Scandinavian design influences are present in this Northcote studio, the tranquil and minimal aesthetic perfectly suited to the inward focus of the yoga practice. Timber, large and luscious plants and a warm white and pastel colour scheme create the backdrop, while feature items such as a bespoke solid timber reception desk, Dowel Jones lighting and Greg Hatton handmade stools were chosen by architect Leo Dewitte as signature touches.

Website: www.goodvibesyoga.com.au