Food myth-busting tips from top diet authors

What should I eat seminar series, diet myths

Next month, we’ll all have the chance to hear six of Australia’s top health and diet book authors engage in some enthusiastic (and no doubt motivating) debate about exactly which of the many conflicting, confusion food philosophies are actually worth following.

The first of it’s kind What Should I Eat’ seminar series, featuring Sarah Wilson (I Quit Sugar), Dr Catherine Itsiopoulos (The Mediterranean Diet), David Gillespie (Eat Real Food), Dr Sue Shepherd (The Complete Low-FODMAP Diet), Professor Kerryn Phelps AM (Ultimate Wellness) and Sporteluxe expert contributor Lola Berry (The 20/20 Diet) will kick off in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne next month. (See below for dates and locations)

To get the ball rolling, we asked three of the star authors involved (all with rather different book focuses) to answer the same three food myth and best tip questions. Each had very different, but equally useful, replies…

What should I eat seminar series, diet myths

SARAH WILSON, Author of I Quit Sugar

1. What do you think the biggest health myth of current times is?

“Other than sugar? The low fat diet! Saturated fat does not cause heart disease… sugar does. Low-fat products contain a huge amount of sugar to make up for loss of flavour and texture. Your low-fat yogurt will often be more fattening than the full-fat version.”

2. If people were to do just one thing to make improve their health or bodies, what would you suggest?

“If I could get people to give up one thing, it would be fruit juice. Freshly squeezed or organic or whatever it is, it contains the same amount of sugar as a can of soft drink. People say, ‘It’s natural’. Sure is. But when you’re drinking fruit juice, you’re just drinking down sugar. Eating the whole fruit is a much more nutritious option.”

3. What’s the biggest thing you see people beat themselves up about that’s really not that bad?

“Eating fats (the good stuff, of course). We are mostly made up of saturated fat. This is what we’re meant to eat. Things like coconut oil, organic butter, the fat and skin on meat or chicken, cheese, eggs, avocado and olive oil are healthy, filling choices.”

What should I eat seminar series, diet myths

DAVID GILESPIE, author of Eat Real Food

1. What do you think the biggest health myth of current times is?

“That a primary benefit of exercise is weight loss.  There are many benefits to exercise but weight loss isn’t one of them.”

2. If people were to do just one thing to make improve their health or bodies, what would you suggest?

“Stop eating foods containing added sugar or added vegetable oil or preferably both.”

3. What’s the biggest thing you see people beat themselves up about that’s really not that bad?

“Saturated fat. If you’ve quit sugar, eat that cream and knock yourself out with that yummy triple Brie.”

What should I eat seminar series, diet myths

LOLA BERRY, author of The 20/20 Diet

1. What do you think the biggest health myth of current times is?

“I think we get really caught up in the latest trends and the quickest way to shed weight, when really it’s so much simpler than that, it’s real food, whole foods, nourishing food. And enjoying them with the souls you love most. Make those choices and you’re set. Then enjoy nourishment in a mindful manner and all those ‘health’ goals will come.”

2. If people were to do just one thing to make improve their health or bodies, what would you suggest?

“Meditate. We get so caught up in stress and mental self talk that we miss the big picture. When you meditate, you’re mind is clearer and it’s much easier to make healthy choices.”

3. What’s the biggest thing you see people beat themselves up about that’s really not that bad?

“I’d say with females we judge our bodies very critically. I think we’re so hard on ourselves and see ourselves in a much harsher light than is actually the case. Notice your mental chatter and turn it around into positive caring words, then watch how things change.”

 

What Should I Eat seminar details

Brisbane: Brisbane City Hall, Tuesday July 21
Melbourne: Athenaeum Theatre, Wednesday July 22
Sydney: Roslyn Packer Theatre, Thursday July 23
Tickets cost $85 and are available from whatshouldIeat.com.au
Image credit: iStock

 

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Rachel Sharp
As the only media identity in Australia to have edited both luxury fashion and fitness magazines, award-winning journalist Rachel Sharp has worked in Sydney, London and Dubai, holding the position of editor on titles including Harper’s BAZAAR and GRAZIA. In 2012, she successfully launched the Australian edition of Women’s Fitness magazine, which scooped Launch of the Year at the 2013 Publishers Australia Excellence Awards. Equal parts fashion-obsessed and fitness enthusiast, Rachel – who grew up in the idyllic beach town of Port Macquarie and is mum to two young children – holds a Bachelors degree in Medical Science and Masters in Writing for Media. Despite the fact she absolutely loves what she does for a living, Rachel would still rather be surfing or snowboarding than at her computer. Carpe diem!