Why we’re ditching juices for tonics

Bring on the shrooms and ginseng, we're ready for next level wellness.

tonics, Orchard Street Elixir Bar, juice, smoothies, health trend
Image via Broadsheet. Photography by Kai Leishman.

You may have read the terms “mushroom shake”, “Chinese herbs” and “moon dust” on the Sporteluxe site lately. And no, before you ask, we haven’t turned into the neighbourhood psychic or taken a liking to witchcraft. We have, however, made one magical discovery to boost our health and wellness. Enter: Tonics.

Turns out, your daily cold-press just doesn’t cut it anymore. Yes, it may be packed with vital nutrients and minerals, but will it reverse the signs of ageing and boost your libido?! Your regular green juice has been de-throned for a more potent, holistic type of concoction.

The truth about tonics

Tonics are herbal in nature and provide nutritional support for a particular part of the body. Most herbs are well known in Ayurvedic medicine and have been used for centuries for their healing properties. Herbs like Ginseng are known to help fight fatigue and help manage stress; while Hawthorn can help support the cardiovascular system and Ashwagandha can improve mental clarity and the immune system.

If you can’t quite imagine yourself saying goodbye to your daily bottle of Kale-Apple-Celery, don’t fret. Tonics are virtually tasteless and are used in conjunction with healthy juices and smoothies. They’re all about taking your wellness to the next level. According to The Herbal Pharmacist, herbs act to “balance” the body and are an addition to your daily supplements, not as a cure or treatment to ailments. Tonics are meant to boost your overall health, and maybe help out with a few issues like stress, fatigue and mental focus.

Sporteluxe’s own resident nutritionist, Michelle Pellizon, hopped on the tonic bandwagon, swapping her morning lattes for ‘shroom shakes:

“I think consumers are finally starting to understand that just because it’s juice doesn’t mean it’s good for you. They’re getting braver about using ancient remedies to heal issues like adrenal fatigue, exhaustion, and mood disorders,” says Michelle Pellizon. 

Where to get your boost

Mushrooms have made a big impact on the health scene lately, with varieties like “reishi” and “cordyceps” making their way into lattes, smoothies and powders. So, it’s no surprise that health mecca L.A has been big on the trend with tonic bars and moon dust sachets popping up all over tinsel town. But, Sydney isn’t far behind.

1Los Angeles

A photo posted by MOON JUICE (@moonjuiceshop) on

  • Moon Juice – We’ve delved into the potent powers of these delectable smoothies and single serve sachets with names like “brain dust” and “sex dust”.
  • Lifehouse Tonics – A tonic powerhouse, Life House Tonics blend their superfood supplements seamlessly with healthy smoothies and juices. You won’t even know the difference!

2Sydney

  • Orchard Street Elixir Bar – An Aussie favourite, Orchard Street have always had their finger on the healthy pulse. Their herbal elixir bar is based in Bondi, filled with booster shots and a range of treats.
  • Cali Press – Cali Press feature their famous brews with enhanced additions like “Organic, wild grown blue-green algae” and “ginger, lemon, green apple and oil of oregano”. A winning combo, in our opinion.
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Andrea is a qualified yoga instructor and writer. With an international background, she grew up on a small island in the Caribbean and speaks both fluent French and English. She now enjoys an active life on the northern beaches of Sydney, as an avid enthusiast of all things surf, yoga, travel and photography. Writing is her favourite way to channel her positive energy and hopes to inspire people towards a healthy and fulfilled lifestyle. Andrea graduated from Paris Business School and Australian Catholic university with a Bachelor of Business, and is currently pursuing her post-grad in Journalism at UTS.