We Need to Talk About Gwyneth Paltrow’s Coffee Colonic

Probs don't try this one at home.

coffee colonic
Image via @gwynethplatrow

January is detox season, a time when we consider all kinds of crazy cleanses in an effort to reset physically and mentally for the new year. Except for this one though, which we’re definitely not going to be giving a test-run: The coffee colonic. Yeah, probably don’t try this one at home, K?

Recently, on Gwyneth Paltrow’s website Goop, an article with the headline “The Beauty and Wellness Detox Guide” suggests that for the price of $135, you can be the proud owner of the Implant O-Rama System At-Home Coffee Enema—which kind of looks like a miniature torture device, TBH.

A coffee enema machine is part of their listed “full detox package.” For the blissfully initiated, an enema involves “flushing out” your intestines by injecting your colon with fluid. Exhibit A:

coffee enema
The coffee colonic. Image via Implant O’Rama

Normally, a doctor might suggest an enema to help deal with chronic constipation or ahead of specific medical procedures, but some people swear by them as a (albeit particularly dramatic) way to cleanse their colons. Fans of the method (and there are plenty of fans!) say it can help remove toxins and food build up in your colon, and is an important way to regularly cleanse—although there isn’t exactly a lot of scientific evidence supporting this viewpoint. (As highlighted in this Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology article.) 

What makes coffee enemas problematic, however, is that according to the Mayo Clinic they have been linked to several deaths, and at the very least can trigger side effects like cramping, bloating, nausea and vomiting.

Of course, it’s always a good idea to chat with your doctor before trying any medical procedure yourself. Coffee enema included.